Notice from Osceola Water Works – June 10, 2021

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Notice from Osceola Water Works: Due to the extreme heat we are experiencing in early June., Osceola Water Works is experiencing large algae growth in West Lake.  Some customers may be experiencing taste and odor within your drinking water.  Please be advised, Osceola Water Works is aware of this issue and is taking corrective action. The water is safe for consumption.  Please be patient while we work through this process. If you have any further questions, please call Osceola Water Works at 641-342-1435.  

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Osceola Water Works Switching To New Billing Structure And Rates

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(OSCEOLA, IA – MAY 26, 2021) Osceola Water Works continually strives to provide safe, quality water to the customers they serve. In an effort to continue effectively and safely serving their customers, OWW will be transitioning to a new billing structure that will include a rate increase to not only allow the department to budget for necessary upkeep, repairs and improvements, but also make calculation and payment of future bills easier. Starting July 1, 2021, OWW customers will see the new billing structure. With the new flat-rate structure, the average residential customer will only see an increase of a few

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NOTICE FROM OSCEOLA WATER WORKS REGARDING WATER QUALITY CONCERNS

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We have recently received complaints regarding the taste and odor of our water.  At this time, Osceola Water Works is going through some changes to the disinfectant in use. Normally, our water system uses something called chloramines for disinfecting the drinking water. Periodically, we switch to free chlorine (or breakpoint chlorination), which is a stronger disinfectant. Free chlorine is used while the water system prepares to flush the distribution system. Due to the weather, we have not been able to flush the system.  Flushing the water mains improves water quality by removing sediment that slowly builds up in the water

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2020 Challenges Motivate Osceola Water Works Team For 2021 Progress

osceola water works water tower on the square

Osceola Water Works (OWW) and the customers they serve faced a number of unprecedented challenges in 2020. While it was understandably a tough year, there were also a number of positives to look back on as 2021 planning starts. The weather at the start of the year was a little uncooperative, but that didn’t keep OWW from completing the water tower rehabilitation project. Through high winds and rain, even some snow, much-needed water tower repairs, cleaning, and painting were all part of the Board’s efforts to provide a source of clean and safe water to the community. Ultimately, they were

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR DRINKING WATER

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Osceola Water Works Did Not Meet Treatment Requirements Our water system recently violated a drinking water standard. Although this was not an emergency, as our customers, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what we did to correct this situation. We routinely monitor your water for turbidity (cloudiness). This tells us whether we are effectively filtering the water supply.  Water samples for the month of September showed that 25 percent of turbidity measurements were over 0.3 turbidity units – the standard is that no more than 5 percent of samples may exceed 0.3 turbidity

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Osceola Water Works Researching Plans for Improved Water Quality

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It seems to be an annual occurrence. As soon as the heat of late summer hits, surface water sources around the midwest become victims of algae blooms, causing treatment challenges for municipalities and water departments and giving citizens concern for their water quality. In Osceola’s West Lake, the algae blooms have been increasingly difficult in the past few years. That, along with ageing filtration system challenges, has the Osceola Water Works team working hard to keep treatments ahead of the issue. Finally, after some engineering research and guidance from the DNR, they believe the issue can be addressed with some

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NOTICE: Watch for Water Works Annual Treatment Change

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Starting in October, Osceola Water Works will begin transitioning to winter maintenance and will be making a change in the water treatment process. While residents may notice a difference, there will be no cause for alarm. In early October, the water works department will begin their annual fire hydrant flushing program. This process allows OWW to perform routine maintenance on the hydrants and to clean out sediment that has settled in the water mains. Department employees will open the fire hydrants and allow them to flow freely for a short period of time. Residents may notice a slight discoloration or trace amounts

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Late Algae Bloom Hits Osceola Water Works

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West Lake, which supplies water to the city of Osceola, is experiencing late season algae issues, requiring increased treatment and causing a change in the treatment needs of the city’s drinking water. Osceola Water Works crews detected a large algae bloom in West Lake on November 7, prompting a necessary late treatment of West Lake. An algae bloom of this size and scope is exceptionally unusual for this time of year, with mid-September being the standard last algae treatment needed. Some customers may have noticed a change in the taste of the water, but the Osceola Water Works department acted

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NOTICE: Water Works Annual Treatment Change

fire hydrant maintenance, fire hydrant flushing

Starting in October, Osceola Water Works will begin transitioning to winter maintenance and will be making a change in the treatment process. Residents may notice a difference, but will have no cause for concern. In early October, the water works department will begin the annual fire hydrant flushing program. This process is a way to perform routine maintenance on the hydrants and to clean out sediment in the water mains. Department employees will open the fire hydrants and allow them to flow freely for a short period of time. Residents may notice slight discoloration or trace amounts of sediment in

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Why and How to Build a Rain Garden

Turn on the Home and Garden channel or visit newer parks and botanical centers and you are bound to hear about a rain garden. Landscapers, homeowners and conservationists are all catching on to rain gardens and spreading the word about what they do and how to build one. While planning and creating your own rain garden may seem like a daunting task, we’re here to answer some questions! What is a rain garden and why is it important? A rain garden is a landscaped area planted with wild flowers and other native vegetation that soak up rain runoff from roofs, driveways or yards.

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